Ancient ‘war grave’ filled with 13,000-year-old battered corpses who killed each other over ‘climate change conflict’

CLIMATE change may have been a major factor in one of the oldest examples of human warfare. New research suggests one of the oldest known war cemeteries may be full of people who died in several skirmishes over a lack of resources rather than one epic battle. PAThe skeletons date back between 13,400 and 18,600 years ago[/caption] Previously, the Jebel Sahaba cemetery in Sudan’s Nile River Valley has been viewed as a site full of people who died in one battle. It’s one of the oldest examples of organised violence and dates back between 13,400 and 18,600 ago. A new study, published in Scientific Reports, re-examined 61 skeletons at the site and found evidence of hundreds more injuries that were not fatal. A quarter of the skeletons showed evidence of healed and unhealed wounds and likely lived through violent situations before their demise. PAResearchers found evidence of healed and unhealed wounds which suggest the individuals led violent lives[/caption] PAThe bones are some of the oldest evidence of human warfare[/caption] Researchers think arrows or spears caused a lot of the wounds and suggest outside groups were attacking each other. Men, women and children were all attacked in the same way, which is in-keeping…

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Ancient ‘war grave’ filled with 13,000-year-old battered corpses who killed each other over ‘climate change conflict’

Updated: May 28, 2021 — 10:27 am