For UFO Hunters, the Owls Really Aren't What They Seem

“The owls are not what they seem.”  This was the cryptic warning uttered by the Giant in Twin Peaks, echoing eerily throughout David Lynch and Mark Frost’s surreal series. For illustrator and author Mike Clelland, though, these psychic pronouncements ring especially true. For the past decade, he has worked tirelessly to catalogue paranormal sightings of the fluffy avian predators.  As the self-described “owl guy” of the UFO world, Clelland has become the foremost writer theorizing a connection between owls and alien encounters. His book on the subject, The Messengers, is a collection of anecdotes from people who claim to have had paranormal experiences involving the ominous birds. It all began after Clelland saw owls circling overhead for an entire hour during a 2006 camping trip. Familiar with a supposed UFO-owl link, Clelland intuitively felt there was something mystical, otherworldly, or even alien to the animals above. Moved by the events, Clelland eventually connected owl sightings to disturbing alien abduction experiences of his own, spurring him to post a call for any strange owl anecdotes on his website.  To his surprise, the stories streamed in, tying the birds to UFOs, abductions, “missing time,” and other strange phenomena. Meanwhile, owls began to…

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For UFO Hunters, the Owls Really Aren’t What They Seem

Moon and Mars conjunction THIS week – watch red planet ‘swing by Moon’ in stunning lunar spectacle

THE MOON and Mars will make a close approach to one another this week in a rare celestial get together. Stargazers in the US and UK should be able to spot the dazzling event with the naked eye in the early hours of Sunday morning. Get all the latest Science newsKeep up-to-date with the top Space & Astronomy storiesAll the latest Archaelogy news from dinosaurs to Ancient artefacts AFPThe Moon (top) and Mars during a conjunction event in 2018[/caption] The coming together, known to astronomers as a conjunction, will peak at 05:47 BST (00:47 ET), according to stargazing site InTheSky.org. The popular page makes precise predictions about the positions of the planets using public data from Nasa’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). During Sunday’s showcase, the waxing crescent moon will swing about two degrees to the south of Mars in the sky. The Red Planet will resemble a bright star. AlamyThe pair only swing close to one another every once in a while[/caption] If you’re not an earlier riser or it’s too bright to see the conjunction from your location then there’s also a chance to catch them the night before. This is advisable for stargazers in the UK. “From the…

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Moon and Mars conjunction THIS week – watch red planet ‘swing by Moon’ in stunning lunar spectacle

Moon and Mars conjunction THIS week – watch red planet ‘swing by Moon’ in stunning lunar spectacle

THE MOON and Mars will make a close approach to one another this week in a rare celestial get together. Stargazers in the US and UK should be able to spot the dazzling event with the naked eye in the early hours of Sunday morning. Get all the latest Science newsKeep up-to-date with the top Space & Astronomy storiesAll the latest Archaelogy news from dinosaurs to Ancient artefacts AFPThe Moon (top) and Mars during a conjunction event in 2018[/caption] The coming together, known to astronomers as a conjunction, will peak at 05:47 BST (00:47 ET), according to stargazing site InTheSky.org. The popular page makes precise predictions about the positions of the planets using public data from Nasa’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). During Sunday’s showcase, the waxing crescent moon will swing about two degrees to the south of Mars in the sky. The Red Planet will resemble a bright star. AlamyThe pair only swing close to one another every once in a while[/caption] If you’re not an earlier riser or it’s too bright to see the conjunction from your location then there’s also a chance to catch them the night before. This is advisable for stargazers in the UK. “From the…

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Moon and Mars conjunction THIS week – watch red planet ‘swing by Moon’ in stunning lunar spectacle

Ah, memory; it’s often infallible. (Yes, you read me correctly)

Copyright 2021, InterAmerica, Inc. The errant consensus that memory is unreliable, applies to eyewitness testimony usually and is used by lawyers in defense of the clients in criminal and civil cases. But is memory always fallible? Nope. In that New Yorker issue that housed the UFO article mentioned here and elsewhere the past week or so is a piece by magazine regular Adam Gopnik: Peripheral Proust [Page 63 ff.] The analysis of Marcel Proust’s various literary personalities is buffered by Proust’s masterpiece, A la Recherche du Temps Perdu, translated nowadays as “In Search of Lost Time” an egregiously mistranslation, replacing Proust’s eminent original biographer C. K. Scott Moncrieff’s Remembrance of Thing’s Past. (In college I assiduously defended the Remembrance … translation, now sort of approved by Gopnik’s observations in his article.) My point here is to defend UFO witness testimony from the quidnuncs who keep stating that UFO witness accounts are refurbished by memory, after the fact, sometimes long after the fact, and thus are not reliable. That canard is incorrect and grievously false. Memory is usually as wholesome as a page from the Britannica Encyclopedia. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/eyewitness-memory-is-a-lot-more-reliable-than-you-think/ Of course, time will smudge recalled events, but Proust’s admired masterwork indicates that…

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Ah, memory; it’s often infallible. (Yes, you read me correctly)